• Paris-Saclay le futur en chantier(s)

    Paris-Saclay le futur en chantier(s)
    • © XDGA, photo 354photographers
    • Paris-Saclay le futur en chantier(s)

      To rethink the traditional tools of urban representation: this is the challenge of the exhibition “Paris-Saclay, le future en chantier(s)”. It is about a coherent city planning which does not dissociate urbanism, landscape and engineering but is simultaneously thought of on several retroactive scales, by a multitude of designers with mutually reliant production.
      Such representation is inevitably based on tools used by landscape designers, architects and urban planners. The range is wide: texts, drawings, photos, collages, models, schemes, elevations…each of them not allowing understanding the project as a whole. Such a vast territory needs an overall mapping; therefore the visitor should not have the impression to be looking at the project from a fixed angle, but to be introduced to the full range of situations, actors, timing and scales of interventions.
      The main goal is to represent the ongoing changing process. The exhibition shows both the qualities of the existing and the ambitious future projected onto Paris-Saclay. Each fragment combines these two narratives; the fresco, the timeline, the model and the projections all relate to history and what is expected to be possible. All projects are shown simultaneously from multiple points of view: from above as for the decision maker and from below as for pedestrians.
      Large scale and autonomous arrangement of the separate elements is a result of the site. The complexity of the space, together with the simple, contemporary exhibition is striking. We always kept this tension in mind, which represents to us the relationship between the city of Paris and Saclay.

      To rethink the traditional tools of urban representation: this is the challenge of the exhibition “Paris-Saclay, le future en chantier(s)”. It is about a coherent city planning which does not dissociate urbanism, landscape and engineering …

    • © XDGA, photo 354photographers
    • © XDGA, photo 354photographers
    • © XDGA, photo 354photographers
    • © XDGA, photo 354photographers
    • © XDGA, photo 354photographers
    • © XDGA, photo 354photographers
    • © XDGA, photo 354photographers
    • © XDGA, photo 354photographers
    • © XDGA, photo 354photographers
    • © XDGA, photo 354photographers
    • 2014130 Paris-Saclay le futur en chantier(s)

      direct commission , ongoing

      CityMaison de l architecture d Ile-de-France, Paris

      Programexhibition

      Year2014

      Proceduredirect commission

      Statusongoing

      ClientEPPS

      Total floor area500 m²

      Budgetconfidential

      ArchitectsFAA-XDGA-MDP

    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • IOC Headquarters

      CONCEPT

      The ‘enfilade’ strategy has certainly reached its limits and is no longer suitable for the actual demand. It will not be able to cope with a premise of 10.000 m² above ground level. Nor does it allow the configuration of a fully interactive work environment. In order not to compete against the castle, XDGA proposes to literally provide a large work-field on ground level, situated at the central part of the site, with the castle positioned inside. All activities are gathered in a large open space, all the supporting facilities are organized under this surface.

      ONE BUILDING

      The building that contains this surface, is conceived as a transparent, prismatic volume, an intermediate structure in between the castle and the surrounding nature. It has a constant perimeter height of 13 meters, allowing a free view from the castle towards the park and vice versa. The castle, in its glorious new role, defines the inside space together with a patio, similar in size.

      ONE ROOF

      As immaterial as the outside skin is intended to be, as tectonic is the roof that slopes down from this horizontal perimeter to the patio and upwards to the castle. The sloping planes along the facades reflect the park or the work spaces inside, thus blurring the boundary between inside and outside. The planes in the middle bring in filtered daylight, the one on top of the castle is fully transparent. The roof symbolizes and visualizes such values as unity and collaboration.

      CONCEPT The ‘enfilade’ strategy has certainly reached its limits and is no longer suitable for the actual demand. It will not be able to cope with a premise of 10.000 m² above ground level. Nor …

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    • PLAN-00
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    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
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    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
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    • 2014176 IOC Headquarters

      competition, finalist

      CityLausanne

      Year2014

      Procedurecompetition

      Statusfinalist

      ClientInternational Olympic Committee (IOC)

      Total floor area13.024 m²

      Budget86.651.276 CHF (71.152.135 €)

      Structural engineerWerner Sobek Engineering

      Mechanical engineerWerner Sobek Engineering

      PhotographsFrans Parthesius

      Surface site19.687 m²

    • © XDGA
    • Vlora Waterfront Promenade

      This design proposal consists in a first phase of the logical extension of the existing boardwalk and broadening of the typical vegetation of Vlora. Extending the trees of Soda Woods over the full 5 km long coastline not only creates a harmonious whole, but also a unique and specific identity for the coastal town, typical of Albania’s Mediterranean landscape. The ‘Aleppo Pine’, a pine native to the Mediterranean region, has a thin stem and a broad but flattened crown, thereby preserving the view onto the sea at all times and offering shade for all kinds of activities underneath the trees (sunbathing, sports, parking …). In a later stage, certain areas can be tackled in a more focused way, for example through the creation of new white beach areas, sports grounds, swimming areas and water parks, a pier and a marina, new hotels, a floating island, … This design proposal is open to interpretation and extremely flexible in sequencing and implementation: an instrument of urban intervention in the urban coastal area of Albania, in order to serve as a model.

      This design proposal consists in a first phase of the logical extension of the existing boardwalk and broadening of the typical vegetation of Vlora. Extending the trees of Soda Woods over the full 5 km …

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    • 2014182 Vlora Waterfront Promenade

      competition − 1st prize, in progress

      CityVlora

      ProgramLandscape Design, Urban Design, Waterfront

      Year2014

      Procedurecompetition − 1st prize

      Statusin progress

      ClientCity of Vlora, Ministry of Tourism, Government of Albania

      Total floor area5 km, approx.125 ha

  • PEGE

    Pôle européen de gestion et d'économie (PEGE)
    • © XDGA
    • PEGE

      There appears to be one constant about academic buildings; they require extensions, often at the cost of their own initial qualities. The existing Management School building in Strasbourg, France, is no exception. The competition asked for a freestanding volume on top of the existing parking, filling completely the only outdoor space of the plot.
      Instead of adding, XDGA’s proposal removes unnecessary elements; making room for new programs inside the existing volume. Two new buildings are built within the existing one; a new library replaces an underused parking level and the demolition of existing floor slabs creates a triple high entrance lobby.
      The new library is a continuous horizontal space. Its uniform structure allows flexibility of use over time. The library’s roof is the courtyard that the university has lacked. It is directly accessible from the existing building and populated with lightweight structures such as an outdoor amphitheater and a glass pavilion for the school’s restaurant that will enhance the campus life.

      There appears to be one constant about academic buildings; they require extensions, often at the cost of their own initial qualities. The existing Management School building in Strasbourg, France, is no exception. The competition asked …

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    • 2013-2016170 PEGE

      competition − 1st prize, in progress

      CityStrasbourg

      Programlibrary, offices, administration

      Year2013-2016

      Procedurecompetition − 1st prize

      Statusin progress

      ClientRégion Alsace

      Total floor area3.280 m² (extension) + 3.875 m² (rehabilitation)

      Budget12.400.000 €

      Structural engineerBollinger + Grohmann

      Mechanical engineerAlto Ingénierie

      EconomyCholley

  • XDGA_expo

    XDGA_expo
    • © XDGA, CIVA
    • XDGA_expo

      On November 7th 2013 the CIVA (Centre International pour la Ville, l’Architecture et le Paysage) opened its doors to the exhibition ‘XDGA_160_expo’ of Xaveer De Geyter Architects which lasted until the 26th of January 2014.

      For more information please visit CIVA

      On November 7th 2013 the CIVA (Centre International pour la Ville, l’Architecture et le Paysage) opened its doors to the exhibition ‘XDGA_160_expo’ of Xaveer De Geyter Architects which lasted until the 26th of January 2014. For …

    • © XDGA, CIVA
    • © XDGA, CIVA
    • © XDGA, CIVA
    • © XDGA, CIVA
    • © XDGA, CIVA
    • © XDGA, CIVA
    • © XDGA, CIVA
    • © XDGA, CIVA
    • © XDGA, CIVA
    • © XDGA, CIVA
    • 2013-2014160 XDGA_expo

      commission,

      CityBrussels

      Programexhibition

      Year2013-2014

      Procedurecommission

      PhotographsCIVA

  • Z33

    Z33
  • Silo building

    Silo building
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • Silo building

      The silo building in the Tweewaters neighborhood requires converting the old grain silos of the brewery into a tower with a mixed program of housing, offices, culture and entertainment. It is a complex renovation of a large building within an urban context. In its design, XDGA has considered the density and quality of the implemented program, and based it upon the potential of the tower. The intelligent revitalization takes into account the urban, architectural and technical aspects of the tower.
      The typical characteristics of the building are both re-used and improved. The tower, a block of 56 cylinders (the former silos), has a height of 73 meters. The core is replaced as the cylinders are not compatible with the shape and size for the necessary amount of circulation and technical space. The profile of the outer shell remains unchanged: within it are mixed programs integrated into the very specific form of the tall, narrow cylinders. At the base, there are commercial spaces and catering businesses. The tower itself is seventy five percent occupied by apartments and twenty five percent by hotel rooms. The detailed designs of the apartments are innovative and flexible; there are a wide range of proposals (twenty different options) on the table, ranging from studios to spacious two-bedroom apartments − each with different configurations of rounded, horizontal sections of the silos, as well as outdoor patios. Above the silo volume floats a rectangular superstructure cantilevered eighteen meters onto street. This volume contains four floors with apartments and offices on the upper level. Between the silo volume and the superstructure is a public terrace with restaurants, the ‘city balcony’.

      The silo building in the Tweewaters neighborhood requires converting the old grain silos of the brewery into a tower with a mixed program of housing, offices, culture and entertainment. It is a complex renovation of …

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    • © XDGA
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    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
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    • 2006-2013149 Silo building

      competition − 1st prize, in progress

      CityLeuven

      Programhousing, hotel, offices, shops, culture

      Year2006-2013

      Procedurecompetition − 1st prize

      Statusin progress

      ClientErtzberg

      Total floor area54.468 m²

      Budget6.430.000 €

      Structural engineerBollinger-Grohmann

      Mechanical engineerStudiebureau Boydens

      PhotographsFrans Parthesius

  • Province Headquarters

    Province Headquarters
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • Province Headquarters

      At the request of the Province of Antwerp in 2011, an architectural competition was launched for the design of a new Government Office. XDGA’s competition proposal, in which the entrance pavilion was integrated into a totally new configuration, was unanimously considered the winner.
      The primary idea of the design is to merge the fragmented small parks in the area (King Albert Park, Harmony Park and the private gardens of the Province). To the broad front of the existing entrance pavilion that closes and breaks the continuity of the site, a new floor plate is placed perpendicular. On top of this cross-shaped volume, an office block rises with floors that fan out. The kinked shaped seeks out the centre of gravity within the park and ensures that it is not ‘weighing’ on the neighboring buildings.
      The new ‘Provincial House’ is designed as a free-standing, compact construction. Essentially, the building combines congress functions in the entrance pavilion and office programs in the new building. The volume of the entrance pavilion is divided into two levels: a half sunken auditorium, exhibition hall, lobby, and debating chamber, and on the first floor, conference and meetings rooms. It functions as a glass pavilion in the park, alternating between a reflective and transparent object. From the exterior, the park is enlarged by its reflection in the glass, and within the volume, one is privileged with the maximum view of the park. Additionally, the glass facade allows for filtered daylight to penetrate the sunken floor below. The upper floors of the existing entrance pavilion will be demolished and replaced by a terrace with beautiful views of the park: ‘the belvedere’.

      At the request of the Province of Antwerp in 2011, an architectural competition was launched for the design of a new Government Office. XDGA’s competition proposal, in which the entrance pavilion was integrated into a …

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    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
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    • 2011-2017146 Province Headquarters

      competition − 1st prize, in progress

      CityAntwerp

      Programnew headquarters for the provincial administration of Antwerp

      Year2011-2017

      Procedurecompetition − 1st prize

      Statusin progress

      ClientProvince of Antwerp

      Total floor area33.000 m²

      Budget60.696.102 €

      LandscapeMichel Desvigne Paysagiste

      Structural engineerBollinger-Grohmann

      Mechanical engineerStudiebureau Boydens

      PhotographsFrans Parthesius

  • Airport Extension

    Extension Airport
    • © XDGA
    • Airport Extension

      Our proposal for a new terminal at the Airport of Geneva consists of a long, floating, transparent volume that frees the ground level as much as possible and is supported on both sides by a set of massive, vertical volumes.

      The volume has two levels of departure gates and an arrival gate is located under the departure gate volume. Along the horizontal terminal, the vertical volumes contain all of the vertical circulation as well as the commercial functions, toilets and access to the planes. Where the airplanes taxi, these volumes are placed at equal intervals while on the other side, they follow rules of functional surface and distances of construction possibilities.

      Our proposal for a new terminal at the Airport of Geneva consists of a long, floating, transparent volume that frees the ground level as much as possible and is supported on both sides by a …

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    • 2011141 Airport Extension

      competition,

      CityGeneva

      ProgramExtension for International Airport Terminal

      Year2011

      Procedurecompetition

      ClientGeneva International Airport

      Total floor area37.567 m²

      Budget183.000.000 €

      ArchitectsXDGA, with partner architect Bureau Dan Budik

      Structural engineerErnst Basler & Partner

      Mechanical engineerErnst Basler & Partner

  • Place Schuman

    Place Schuman
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • Place Schuman

      Today the Schuman Circle suffers from a lack of morphological coherence. Its physical perimeter is poorly defined. Its circular geometry dissipates at the Berlaymont and Justus Lipsius façades which are set back. Nevertheless, its symbolic vocation as a public place is very real and further confirmed by its often impromptu use as a place of gathering.

      In our new design for the Schuman Square, its various vocations must become integrated and do the following:

      • Underline the historic symbolism of the perspectives through the arches and Rue de la Loi.
      • Offer a strong symbolic representation of a democratic civic rather than institutional Europe and strengthen its presence in Brussels.
      • Create a real, physically well-defined, and coherent public square.
      • Provide the capacity to welcome very different daily and exceptional uses both in functional terms and in numbers.

      As it becomes an increasingly central location within the European district, the future of Schuman Square also plays a crucial role in the physical representation of Europe. The institutions suffer from an often too bureaucratic image made manifest in the secured administration buildings that are rarely accessible to the public. The idea of a democratic and civic Europe is more clearly symbolized by a public place; a real Square, a place of meeting, debate, demonstration; a place of political, cultural and recreational gathering. This place of civic meeting follows the logic of the circle, the power which emanates from the people.

      Today the Schuman Circle suffers from a lack of morphological coherence. Its physical perimeter is poorly defined. Its circular geometry dissipates at the Berlaymont and Justus Lipsius façades which are set back. Nevertheless, its symbolic …

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    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
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    • 2010-2017139 Place Schuman

      competition − 1st prize,

      CityBrussels

      Programpublic space

      Year2010-2017

      Procedurecompetition − 1st prize

      ClientBrussels Capital Region

      Total floor area29.544 m² (underground: 935 m², amphitheatre: 2.462 m², square: 26.147 m²)

      Budget13.238.000 €

      LandscapeMichel Desvigne Paysagiste

      Structural engineerNey & Partners

      PhotographsFrans Parthesius

  • Paris-Saclay

    Paris-Saclay
    • © XDGA-FAA
    • Paris-Saclay

      This project, currently ongoing, it’s a challenge in terms of scale; the 385 km² located in the south-east of Paris, it is extending from Saint Quentin en Yvelines until Massy, for a lenght of more than 25km. The site is meant to mainly host research facilities linked to the university; an important proportion of French public research and corporate R&D is conducted in Paris-Saclay and more than 5 000 000 m² will be built in the future. The French and Parisian governments want to develop Paris-Saclay into a leading international centre for technology and science. Compact urbanization preserves the existing agricultural activities for the future.
      The general urban plan that we are developing will have lanscape and public space as the structuring element, together with a new public transport infrastructure that will link the site to center of Paris, creating also synergies with the valley around: a new metro line will link the campus with the metropolis.
      The area is also the last major agricultural plateau in the region. However, the objective is not to completely urbanize the plateau nor to dislodge agricultural production. Under the guidance of Michel Desvigne Paysagiste  and in collaboration with Xaveer de Geyter Architecten – Floris Alkemade Architects research is focused on how both objectives can be reconciled within a newly developed vision. Entitled ‘enhanced geography’: the agricultural activities and the existing qualities of the landscape form the basis of the implantation of the campus. Paris-Saclay will not be an ordinary city, but an archipelago of park campuses linked by a chain of public spaces, parks and farmland.

      This project, currently ongoing, it’s a challenge in terms of scale; the 385 km² located in the south-east of Paris, it is extending from Saint Quentin en Yvelines until Massy, for a lenght of more …

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    • 2009-2015130 Paris-Saclay

      commission, in progress

      CityParis

      ProgramMixed use master-plan, housing, offices, shopping, infrastructure, universities

      Year2009-2015

      Procedurecommission

      Statusin progress

      ClientOIN Paris-Saclay

      ArchitectsXDGA-FAA

      LandscapeMichel Desvignes Paysagiste

      ModelXDGA

      Photographs354 photographes

      Building area5.000.000 m²

      Surface site385 km²

      ConsultantTractebel (Tritel), Arep, Setec TPI

    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • PAPS Department of Politics and Public Administration

      The new faculty building PAPS for the University of Strasbourg (France) was to be implanted on the historic site of an old hospital. XDGA proposes to radically open the closed site and make it accessible to the public, so that students, teachers, faculty staff and other users can meet and access the building from several entries to the site. By lifting the main volume of the building, a place underneath occurs that spans towards the city centre of Strasbourg. The sunken storeys of the building form a choreography of inclined ramps and stairs, which serve as vertical connections as well as meeting spaces and classrooms. In the middle of the building is an atrium where everything and everyone comes together.

      The new faculty building PAPS for the University of Strasbourg (France) was to be implanted on the historic site of an old hospital. XDGA proposes to radically open the closed site and make it accessible …

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    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
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    • 2009126 PAPS Department of Politics and Public Administration

      competition,

      CityStrasbourg

      Programauditorium, classrooms, offices, library, cafetaria, garden, bycicle parking

      Year2009

      Procedurecompetition

      ClientPôle d’Administration Publique de Strasbourg (PAPS)

      Total floor area12.500 m²

      Budget22.240.000 €

      Structural engineerNey & Partners

      Mechanical engineerAlto Ingénierie

      ModelXDGA

      PhotographsFrans Parthesius

      EconomyCholley

  • Nørreport station

    Nørreport station
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • Nørreport station

      The two strong and big-scale gestures of the hall, spanning all the existing elements in the street, and the bicycle parking, liberating the street surface, allow for diversity, multitude and transparency on a lower scale. A third feature that binds the space together is a single pavement material for the entire peninsula, including a continuation towards the inner city and inside the bicycle parking: a circular pavement stone with a triflex finish, which is a thick and durable white paint with light reflecting glass pearls inserted. It slightly lightens up the entire peninsula at night.

      Two new pavilions that contain ticketing, public toilets, a convenience store and an area for staff on the first floor, are situated at both edges of the main hall. Their roofs have photovoltaic panels that

      provide electricity for the lighting of the area. In between the ventilation shafts a linear series of circular benches provide waiting areas for the buses.

      The ventilation pipes are painted in a coherent range from shiny black to white. The existing stairs are marked with new information panels. Four sales stalls are situated along æggetorvet. The overall lighting system is provided by the network of wire hung lamps, covering the whole area, including the hall. The glass pearls on the surface of the street unify the area. Specific lighting fixtures, such as the pavilions and stalls themselves, and indirect lighting under the benches, complete the system. All elements together form a slightly chaotic, but very open battery of street furniture allowing for an intense use and crossing of the area.

      The two strong and big-scale gestures of the hall, spanning all the existing elements in the street, and the bicycle parking, liberating the street surface, allow for diversity, multitude and transparency on a lower scale. …

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    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • 2009122 Nørreport station

      competition,

      CityCopenhagen

      Programpublic square, roof and pavilions for the underground train and subway station and a new bicycle parking

      Year2009

      Procedurecompetition

      ClientCity of Copenhagen, Rail Net Denmark and DSB

      Total floor area15.711 m² (square: 11.660m², gateway: 1.282 m², kiosks: 400 m², underground bicycle parking: 2.369 m²)

      Budget160.000.000 DK excl. VAT (21.465.000 €)

      Structural engineerNey & Partners

      Mechanical engineerStudiebureau Boydens

      PhotographsFrans Parthesius

  • Warehouse MacDonald

    Warehouse MacDonald
    • © Philippe Guignard
    • Warehouse MacDonald

      The project consists of a master plan, the rehabilitation and the extension of a 600 meters long warehouse, situated on the Boulevard MacDonald in the north of Paris. Based on the urban plan of OMA in collaboration with Floris Alkemade, the office of XDGA will coordinate the realization of the whole program with a team of ten internationally renowned architecture offices. Besides the coordination XDGA will design the complete program of retail and a plot of housing.

      The project consists of a master plan, the rehabilitation and the extension of a 600 meters long warehouse, situated on the Boulevard MacDonald in the north of Paris. Based on the urban plan of OMA …

    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
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    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © Cyrille Weiner
    • © Philippe Guignard
    • 2008-2016118 Warehouse MacDonald

      commission, in progress

      CityParis

      Programmaster plan, housing, offices, shops, infrastructure, public space

      Year2008-2016

      Procedurecommission

      Statusin progress

      ClientParis Nord Est

      Total floor area150.200 m²

      Budget330.540.000 €

      ArchitectsXDGA-FAA (Floris Alkemade Architect)

      LandscapeMichel Desvigne Paysagiste

      Structural engineerSetec

  • Swiss-Re Headquarters

    Swiss-Re Headquarters
    • © XDGA
    • Swiss-Re Headquarters

      The prominent lakeside condition for the Swiss Re headquarters forms an exceptional context for generating a daring architectural concept. But even more intriguing to us are the somewhat hidden qualities of the existing situation. The first is that the central building is linked to all the neighboring premises of the company through underground and above ground connections, and that the new building will function as a centripetal platform between these different entities. The second is that after the former building will be demolished; there will be a huge underground space available that for once will not be completely used for car parking.

      Our proposal is to confiscate this space and install a sunken sculpture garden, in which a freestanding, compact and cubic new building is positioned. The entire site is transformed into a below grade, dug out space. It is a space that is shared with the city: the garden is fully visible from the surrounding streets. Through this space the Swiss Re art collection may become a main communication and representation device towards the outside world. The cube stands floating in it and the various underground tunnels are transformed into viaducts hanging in the garden. The trajectories in between the different buildings are transformed into spatial scenery. The proposal’s compactness offers the buildings behind a view onto the lake.

      The prominent lakeside condition for the Swiss Re headquarters forms an exceptional context for generating a daring architectural concept. But even more intriguing to us are the somewhat hidden qualities of the existing situation. The …

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    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • 2008117 Swiss-Re Headquarters

      competition,

      CityZurich

      Programheadquarters of Swiss Reinsurance, offices

      Year2008

      Procedurecompetition

      ClientSwiss-Re

      Total floor area20.000 m²

      PhotographsFrans Parthesius

  • Rue de la Loi

    Rue de la Loi
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • Rue de la Loi

      A European international design competition was launched in 2008, aiming to redefine the city form of the Brussels Rue de la Loi and to improve the urban environment and integration of the European institutions. XDGA addresses the challenges of density, urban mix, mobility and public space, and proposes to accommodate the whole program into a single, very compact urban block, with a tunnel underneath and intersected by two central axes. The concentration of high-rise buildings defined by the figure of the ‘canyon’ is impressive, but simultaneously adapts to the existing urban fabric.

      A European international design competition was launched in 2008, aiming to redefine the city form of the Brussels Rue de la Loi and to improve the urban environment and integration of the European institutions. XDGA …

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    • © XDGA
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    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • 2008-2009116 Rue de la Loi

      competition,

      CityBrussels

      Programdefinition of a new urban form for the Rue de la Loi

      Year2008-2009

      Procedurecompetition

      ClientBrussels Capital Region

      Total floor area506.000 m² (excl. parking)

      LandscapeMichel Desvigne Paysagiste

      Structural engineerNey & Partners

      PhotographsFrans Parthesius

  • International Criminal Court (ICC)

    International Criminal Court (ICC)
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • International Criminal Court (ICC)

      XDGA proposed to organize the ICC complex like a small fragment of a city, composed of a collection of independent building volumes around a central square. The volumes are connected through a lower socle which is embedded in the landscape. A long stretch of public space is cut into the landscape and the socle. On the site, the former dun escape is reinstated. The original topography is adapted in order to conceal the socle and the underground parking garage.

      The composition is formed by simple, vertical volumes of varying height with only one exception: the court volume. The floating courtroom volume is supported by a lower building. It is a vertical ‘salle des pas perdus’; the vibrant center of the institute. The unique section of the socle allows the various security requirements to be achieved in a subtle but effective way. Above the arrival square, the luminous ceiling of the floating volume is composed of a pattern of member state flag panels, alternating with white panels for states that are still to join.

      The facades on the outer edge of the complex are defined by vertical concrete fins that act as a security device against blasts. They have transparent glass in between allowing public visibility of the activities of the ICC. The concept allows not only for future expansion but it can also absorb variable factors, changes during the planning process, and even unforeseen changes in the program. The micro-city becomes denser while it also conserves all of its defining qualities.

      XDGA proposed to organize the ICC complex like a small fragment of a city, composed of a collection of independent building volumes around a central square. The volumes are connected through a lower socle which …

    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • 2008112 International Criminal Court (ICC)

      competition,

      CityThe Hague

      Programpermanent premises of the International Criminal Court: offices court, courtrooms, offices, press, public facilities, parking, park

      Year2008

      Procedurecompetition

      ClientInternational Criminal Court

      Total floor area32.000 m²

      LandscapeMichel Desvigne Paysagiste

      PhotographsFrans Parthesius

  • New Port House

    New Port House
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • New Port House

      With this project the new Port House gets the best possible location: on the edge of the city, with a view on the harbour, on the river and on the city. The former fire station not only becomes a dense work space, but also the new face of the Port House and the place where the relation between port and city is mediated.

      The immediate surroundings will modify dramatically in the near future. After the demolition of the silos, the fire station is again situated in the axis of the dock. A project for an imposing new bridge ‘Lange Wapper’ is planned. Therefore an adjustment to these new proportions arises.

      As a typical city block – that separates private and public – the existing building seems lost in the context of a port. Nevertheless the building takes its strong identity from this ‘displacement’. For us, any project for a horizontal extension will weaken the strong basic form.

      We propose an extension that towers high above the new bridge. The new element has an identical footprint to the existing building. Doing so, the distorted proportions are rectified and the new Port House thus becomes a new composition consisting of the heavy rhythmical fire station, a vertical and transparent iron core, and an abstract floating volume, with the horizontal bridge as a background. In this way, the ensemble will play its own role in the skyline of the port.

      With this project the new Port House gets the best possible location: on the edge of the city, with a view on the harbour, on the river and on the city. The former fire station …

    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • 2008111 New Port House

      competition,

      CityAntwerp

      Programrenovation of an existing monumental building and extension with offices

      Year2008

      Procedurecompetition

      ClientAntwerp Municipal Port Authority

      Total floor area7.432 m² (existent building), 8.364 m² (new building), 5.960 m² (parking)

      Budget9.840.000 € (existent building), 19.800.000 € (new building), 3.400.000 € (parking)

      ArchitectsXDGA, with Barbara Van Der Wee (renovation existing building)

      LandscapeMichel Desvigne Paysagiste

      Structural engineerVK Engineering

      Mechanical engineerStudiebureau Boydens

      PhotographsFrans Parthesius

  • Police Station

    Police Station
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • Police Station

      The design of a new police station in Kortrijk has a triangular floor plan – which corresponds exactly with the shape of the building site – and is characterized by a regular pattern of perforations, both in the upper storeys with offices, as well as in the lower storeys with parking. The perforations vary depending on their function as voide, patio, reversed patio, atrium or glass box. They make the generic plan specific and provide visual and physical relationships between the different floors.

      The design of a new police station in Kortrijk has a triangular floor plan – which corresponds exactly with the shape of the building site – and is characterized by a regular pattern of perforations, …

    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • 2007-2013097 Police Station

      competition − 1st prize, discontinued

      CityKortrijk

      Programpolice headquarters

      Year2007-2013

      Procedurecompetition − 1st prize

      Statusdiscontinued

      ClientStadsontwikkelingsbedrijf Kortrijk

      Total floor area23.000 m²

      Budget20.836.905 €

      Structural engineerNey & partners

      Mechanical engineerStudiebureau Boydens

      PhotographsFrans Parthesius

  • Bezalel Academy of Art and Design

    Bezalel Academy of Art and Design
    • © XDGA
    • Bezalel Academy of Art and Design

      The new school campus is conceived as a series of public spaces integrated into the existing city. Each of these spaces have particular qualities which introduce singular activities and attract different users, increasing the liveliness of this part of the city center.

      Two similar, perforated and square buildings-one raised and one sunken-sit atop a new mineral landscape. One houses all of the workshop and studio spaces of the different departments which are organized along a spiral ziggurat and an open, central courtyard. The other building contains the classes, computer rooms and administration, all of which are stacked on top of one another. Below the mineral surface, all of the main collective functions are organized around a view onto a garden. The mineral landscape mediates between the existing topography of the surrounding streets and the newly shaped outdoor spaces. This landscape is a formal reference to the stone roof of the museum, while the two square buildings are formally free-standing objects, as is the church between them. The exchange between the school and the surrounding public space occurs through three specific spatial elements; a glass box gallery space under the elevated building, functioning as a light-well in the middle of the logia on the ground floor of the elevated building and providing visual contact between the exhibition, exhibition visitors, visitors of the library and people walking through the logia of  the building. A second is the inverted ziggurat-shaped courtyard inside the studio building, accessible from the main entrance and widening towards the top. The space functions as a mix of gallery, circulation and workspace, provoking the exchange between the different departments. The third is the lowered, carved-out, outdoor workspace of the glass and ceramics department, where people passing by on the street can see the students doing craftwork.

      The new school campus is conceived as a series of public spaces integrated into the existing city. Each of these spaces have particular qualities which introduce singular activities and attract different users, increasing the liveliness …

    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • 2007089 Bezalel Academy of Art and Design

      competition − 2nd prize,

      CityJeruzalem

      Programnew campus for the architecture department of the academy

      Year2007

      Procedurecompetition − 2nd prize

      ClientBezalel Academy of Art and Design

      Total floor area30.000 m²

      PhotographsXDGA

  • Place Rogier

    Place Rogier
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • Place Rogier

      Centrally located on the Place Rogier, a new large patio opens up the existing underground networks of public transport and connects them with each other. The patio is covered by a circular canopy with a diameter of 64 meters, which also provides shelter at the bus stop and a large part of Place Rogier. The canopy connects the square and the urban space of the Brussels’ ring. Along the north side of the ring is a pedestrian strip with terraces, trees and greenery. The whole project links subsoil and topsoil, and the square becomes again a prominent place in the city.

      Centrally located on the Place Rogier, a new large patio opens up the existing underground networks of public transport and connects them with each other. The patio is covered by a circular canopy with a …

    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • 2006-2015080 Place Rogier

      competition − 1st prize, in progress

      CityBrussels

      Programrenewal of Place Rogier and the Boulevard Botanique, with the rehabilitation of the subway station Rogier

      Year2006-2015

      Procedurecompetition − 1st prize

      Statusin progress

      ClientBrussels Capital Region

      Total floor area45.000 m² (square: 9.000 m², metro: 7.000 m², boulevard: 29.000 m²)

      Budget20.000.000 €

      LandscapeMichel Desvigne Paysagiste

      Structural engineerNey & Partners

      Mechanical engineerStudiebureau Boydens

      PhotographsFrans Parthesius

  • Baltic Pearl

    Baltic Pearl
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • Baltic Pearl

      From a European perspective, two elements of the brief from the Baltic Pearl project are of immediate fascination; the first, a seemingly improbable combination of programs. There are not only a series of “commercial” programs but also a clear intention to combine and integrate them with housing in such a way that they might collectively result in an entirely new urban form. The second element is simply the unprecedented scale of that program. The key notion in our proposal, fundamental to both the urban plan and the landmark building, is to blatantly juxtapose these different elements, horizontally in the former, vertically in the latter. It is the friction between these which can generate a fresh sense of urbanity.

      Our proposal attempts to maintain the existing visual connection to the bay by dividing the site into three distinct zones characterized by three approaches to density and thus to scale as well. The two outer strips absorb the majority of the built program, allowing the lower density of the central strip to maintain a vast perspective towards the bay, occupied by a few special buildings. These strips work independently of the proposed road network for the site yet do not compromise it, instead allowing drivers and pedestrians to experience the strips different characters as well.

      The design of our landmark consists of a commercially dominated program within the format of a group of towers. The towers are of equal size and are grouped together in a specific configuration to form a complex. Where the towers come together, the opportunity arises to accommodate programs requiring much larger floor plate sizes. Where the towers are more independent, the possibility arises to create an autonomy better suited to other parts of the program.

      From a European perspective, two elements of the brief from the Baltic Pearl project are of immediate fascination; the first, a seemingly improbable combination of programs. There are not only a series of “commercial” programs …

    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • 2005069 Baltic Pearl

      idea competition,

      CitySaint Petersburg

      Programmasterplan for the extension of Sint Petersburg and design of a landmark building with appartments, commercial functions, casino, hotel, offices, aquatic center

      Year2005

      Procedureidea competition

      ClientZOA Baltic Pearl

      Total floor area345.000 m² landmark, 1.000.000 m² housing

  • Private house

    Private house
  • Police and Justice Center (PJC)

    Police and Justice Center (PJC)
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • Police and Justice Center (PJC)

      How to implant a big and monotonous program like the Police-and Justice Centre into a super city block right in the center Zürich? The starting point for our design was the acceptance of the monotony its program. We proposed a pattern of parallel stripes that is molded into a continuous volume. The stripes are bended according to the peculiar shape of the given site and obstacles that are around it. The building can be realized in three construction phases each with their own program. Between the stripes intriguing spaces are generated.

      The building functions on two scales. The bended building strips and internal street like spaces relate to the scale of the surroundings and integrate the super-block into the direct context. Sometimes they open the volume to its surrounding sometimes they close it thus creating variable views into, through and out of the building. The spaces in between the stripes serve as gardens, atriums or internal streets. The facades of the office parts are transparent; the prison part is closed by a stone facade with mirror glass windows giving light to the cells. Cross connecting bridges on all the levels provide a flexible organization of the program.

      The ground floor stands in harsh contrast to the stripes of the upper floors. This level works on the scale of a super-city-block. As a one level extrusion of the site’s shape it is organized in several programmatic fields: commerce, museum, laboratories, IT center, entrance hall, restaurant, auditorium, educational center, etc. They formulate a visually open and large scale base to mediate between the office and prison program on the upper levels and the logistical levels underground.

      In the inflexion of the volume the main entrance is situated. It connects the preliminary square with the entrance hall of the Police and Justice Centre.

      How to implant a big and monotonous program like the Police-and Justice Centre into a super city block right in the center Zürich? The starting point for our design was the acceptance of the monotony …

    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • 2005065 Police and Justice Center (PJC)

      competition,

      CityZurich

      Programpolice and justice center including a prison, offices and public functions

      Year 2005

      Procedurecompetition

      ClientBaudirektion Kanton Zürich

      Total floor area112.060 m²

      Budget243.000.000 €

      LandscapeMichel Desvigne Paysagiste

      Structural engineerNey & Partners

      Mechanical engineerErnst Basler + Partner

      PhotographsFrans Parthesius

  • EPFL Learning Center

    EPFL Learning Center
    • © XDGA
    • EPFL Learning Center

      In order to enrich and intensify the urban figure of the EPFL university campus as well as to install a visual relation with the splendid surroundings, the best location for the Learning Centre is at the very core of the existing campus; on the Esplanade and directly grafted on the main circulation axes at various levels of the existing campus buildings.
      By doing so we can transform the original competition site (which we enlarge to its maximum size) into a continuous park, with a number of cutouts for parking, gardens and future building programs. In this sense it forms a counterpart to the existing campus in which the open space is limited to a series of leftover fragments between buildings.
      At the center of the campus, the Allée de Savoye is reshaped into a big void; a green mall. At the south side the Allée dives under the Route du Lac to establish a link with the future student housing area. On the north side it leads to the Esplanade, with the new Learning Center on top.
      Underneath the reshaped Esplanade a new cafeteria, the student organization offices, a shop and a bicycle storage are housed with a view onto the Allée de Savoye. Furthermore it contains a parking garage, a loading bay and technical space.
      The vertical circulation is organized through a combination of a vertical shaft with elevators and double helix escape stairs, and an inclined void throughout the building with a cascade of stairs and escalators. This outside space can be covered by a glass roof in winter.

      In order to enrich and intensify the urban figure of the EPFL university campus as well as to install a visual relation with the splendid surroundings, the best location for the Learning Centre is at …

    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • 2004059 EPFL Learning Center

      competition,

      CityLausanne

      Programlaboratory for learning, a library and an international cultural hub for EPFL, open to both students and the public

      Year2004

      Procedurecompetition

      ClientConfédération Suisse represented by the Council of Polytechnic Schools, Ecole Polytechnique Fédéral de Lausanne (EPFL)

      Total floor area20.000 m²

      Structural engineerOve Arup & Partners

      Mechanical engineerOve Arup & Partners

      PhotographsXDGA

  • European Patent Office (EPO)

    European Patent Office (EPO)
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • European Patent Office (EPO)

      The conception and planning of this important new office building on the EPO site is the ideal opportunity to reconsider both the internal coherence of the complex and the relation between the site and its surroundings. Today this relationship is characterized by an anonymous and rather banal urban fabric and architecture. The south side of the EPO site recently became a valuable green area on top of a parking garage, and in terms of cost-efficiency the EPO II building should keep on functioning during the construction of the new building. Above all, EPO needs a stronger image, towards the highway, towards the neighbourhood and towards its own site.
      Our proposal is to locate a new building in front of EPO Plaza which celebrates the entrance to the complex. The new building manifests itself as a hybrid that consists of a very large vertical part with tall cut-outs opening onto the Veraartlaan, and a horizontal element that runs along and under a new terraced Plaza. The vertical building contains the offices; the horizontal one houses a meeting centre and a multipurpose room, and it deals with all the connections, parking and storage. The main access in the existing “Hinge”-building remains and is accessed from the elevated and terraced Plaza through the gates of the new office building.
      The 97 meter high building is conceived as a Janus-faced object. The front towards the Veraartlaan presents itself as a series of towers connected at the upper part: this side with ramps and stairs at its bottom has a very deep profile and a series of ‘common’ office facades which are variations of one and the same façade system. These variations are obtained through using a combination of different glass colours, varied degrees of transparencies and changing gridlines. The Plaza facade presents itself as one surface with three significant openings in it. Depth is created within the façade by the superposition of different layers: a series of vertical glass fins on the outside that will be visible from the highway, create solar shading and light reflection. Behind, a double climatic glass wall is introduced as an environmental moderator. This layer provides sun protection and an acoustic barrier while allowing individual natural ventilation. The third layer consists of the regular office cell division interrupted by a series of three-dimensional meeting zones.

      The conception and planning of this important new office building on the EPO site is the ideal opportunity to reconsider both the internal coherence of the complex and the relation between the site and its …

    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA
    • 2004-2005055 European Patent Office (EPO)

      competition − 1st prize, discontinued

      CityThe Hague

      Programoffices, public facilities and convention centre

      Year2004-2005

      Procedurecompetition − 1st prize

      Statusdiscontinued

      ClientEuropean Patent Office (EPO)

      Total floor area71.000 m²

      Budget105.000.000 €

      LandscapeMichel Desvigne Paysagiste

      Structural engineerOve Arup & Partners

      Mechanical engineerOve Arup & Partners

      PhotographsFrans Parthesius

  • Oxymétal Housing

    Oxymétal Housing
    • © XDGA
    • Oxymétal Housing

      A high density housing program, providing 410 apartments, some local commercial activities and a vast parking facility is to be installed in a low density part of the city. The site is located on the dividing line between the homogeneous urban fabric of the inner city and the loose conurbation of the periphery. Today the railway tracks cut the area from the centre, but in a nearby future part of them will be transformed into a new part of the city.
      The immediate surroundings are a compilation of workshops, individual housing, and collective housing buildings standing loose from the street. A series of repetitive semi-public gardens make the only coherence. Through its layout the project establishes new physical and visual continuities with the existing open space and with the new developments on the railway area. The new buildings are positioned along two adjacent streets, standing on a half sunken parking garage and leaving a maximum size garden at the center of the parcel. One long block is placed along Jouhaux Street. Six gates give access to the different entrance halls. The central opening is high and monumental, creating a passage from the street where a new tram stop will be installed, towards the new garden. The smaller blocks are placed on pilotis and parallel to the main block along Vernet Street, allowing large views, and creating links towards the future developments of the station environment. One more irregular volume is at the other side of the garden. The parking facilities are located in a half sunken parking garage that connects the different buildings, and partly in open air at the border of the garden.
      The volumes are a composition of tree superposed elements: a pedestal volume of two layers cut up by the gates, a main volume of six layers and roof pavilions of one layer. The lower volumes have glass brick balconies. The main volume has a large scale aluminum louver system with an alternating pattern on the street side and a continuous horizontal pattern on the garden side. The roof pavilions are clad in glass mosaic tiles. Mirroring stainless steel cladding for the columns, colorless glass mosaic for the walls and translucent polycarbonate as a ceiling frame the views on entrance level.

      A high density housing program, providing 410 apartments, some local commercial activities and a vast parking facility is to be installed in a low density part of the city. The site is located on the …

    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • 2003-2009050 Oxymétal Housing

      commission, built

      CityBordeaux

      Programhousing with 410 apartments

      Year2003-2009

      Procedurecommission

      Statusbuilt

      ClientKaufman & Broad, SCI Richelieu

      Total floor area53.285 m²

      Budget24.400.000 €

      Structural engineerBETEC

      Mechanical engineerHolisud

      PhotographsXDGA

  • Les Halles

    Les Halles
    • © OMA - XDGA - ONE, photo Hans Werlemann
    • Les Halles

      The destruction of les Halles seems to mark the turning point in France of public distrust of the modern cityscape. The giant underground program that was built there was never able to actively participate in the street life of Paris, despite its new function of being a main access gate to the heart of the capital of a very much centralized country. The intention of our project is therefore to install a direct relation between the underground program of shops, cinema, culture, subway and RER stations with the traditional city above; between interior and exterior, through the creation of a new cityscape. A set of garden, together with new voids and a series of small, similar buildings redefine the relation with the traditional Paris. If the existing situation can be described as an indifferent layering of underground programs with a garden on top without interaction between them, the main intervention is to make these layers appear above street level and simultaneously to have the ground level drop down to the lowest floors. The underground world becomes visible in the park and the two dimensional superimposition of programs is turned into a three-dimensional space allowing the underground programs to express themselves on the level of the city. A series of similar, small buildings, but with different identities, emerge from the various programmatic strata. They are set in a unifying field of circles, many gardens instead of one overall park. Rather than nature ‘to look at’, they are green spots to be programmed, appropriated, exploited and changed by different users. The existing ’forum’, a rather autistic void in the underground, is filled with new program. A new ‘Canyon’ is introduced to bring all the key elements on different levels in direct relation and to bring the main public transport interchange platform in contact with the open air.

      The destruction of les Halles seems to mark the turning point in France of public distrust of the modern cityscape. The giant underground program that was built there was never able to actively participate in …

    • © OMA - XDGA - ONE, photo Hans Werlemann
    • © OMA - XDGA - ONE, photo Hans Werlemann
    • © OMA - XDGA - ONE
    • © OMA - XDGA - ONE
    • © OMA - XDGA - ONE
    • © OMA - XDGA - ONE
    • © OMA - XDGA - ONE
    • © OMA - XDGA - ONE
    • 2003-2004048 Les Halles

      competitive dialogue − competition,

      CityParis

      Year2003-2004

      Procedurecompetitive dialogue − competition

      Total floor area300.000 m² (renovation) + 35.000 m² (new)

      ArchitectsOMA (mandatory), XDGA, One Architecture

      LandscapeAgence Ter

      Structural engineerOve Arup & Partners

      Mechanical engineerOve Arup & Partners

      PhotographsHans Werlemann

  • National archives

    National archives
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • National archives

      A new ‘City of science, research and innovation’, installed on a former steel industry site, has an old blast furnace as its central icon. The new archive building is to be located on the edge of it, and in the urban plan it forms a low and long acoustic screen against nearby remaining industrial activity. Although the furnace is of an impressive monumentality, we consider it poor in terms of representation of the innovative. We propose to enrich the skyline of the science city and the archive to become one element in it. The proposal is a sculptural form generated by a tension between the heavy and the capricious. A solid mass of archive rooms is opposed to light and floating volumes with additional programs. The main volume consists of two rows of four archive spaces each, along a central corridor. Through shifting the two rows with one module, two cavities are created on opposite corners. The other volumes are installed inside these cavities: the corner towards a central square houses public functions floating above the entrance and a cafeteria, the opposite one administration.
      The archive volume, with logistics and workshops on the lower floors, and a library on the top floor, is organized in a rational, compact and economic way; the additional volumes are spectacular and extravagant. The entire building is cladded in glass. The archive volume has inclined panels of opaque limousine glass which reflect the surroundings in a mosaic pattern; the cavity on the public side is transparent, the other one in vivid orange glass. The cantilevered volumes have both transparent parts and reflective surfaces: seen from a nearby highway, the entrance to the building is reflected in the inclined ceiling of the auditorium.

      A new ‘City of science, research and innovation’, installed on a former steel industry site, has an old blast furnace as its central icon. The new archive building is to be located on the edge …

    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • 2003046 National archives

      competition,

      CityEsch-Belval

      Programarchives, offices

      Year2003

      Procedurecompetition

      ClientNational archives Fonds Belval Luxembourg

      Total floor area37.600 m²

      Structural engineerOve Arup & Partners

      Mechanical engineerOve Arup & Partners

  • Kitchen Tower

    Kitchen Tower
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • Kitchen Tower

      The master plan calls for the appropriation of the land along the ring road, a zone that is normally only desirable for commercial visibility. Therefore, a signal building is proposed along the ring road and adjacent to a central axis of the campus, extended to the southwest. Thus, the entire campus is suspended between an existing water tower and the new kitchen tower. The concept of the building can be seen as a reversal of the classic typology of the tower.
      Facing the campus, a black, perforated rectangular volume contains an external fire escape. Facing the ring road, a filter-like screen of four white elements that contain all the building services, including a high-performance air handling system for the eight kitchens and a service elevator, works as a sun shield. In the interstitial spaces, two panoramic elevators carry all building users. All vertical elements provide a kinetic game when seen from the car on the boulevard. These external ‘cores’ support the central floor slabs that measure 12 by 12 meters. For hygienic reasons, even the details of the full glass facade are exterior. The building operates as an autonomous entity within the campus. The tower is crowned by a double height bar-restaurant that surrounds an outdoor patio in the middle of the square plan, all with a panoramic view over Brussels.

      BIGMAT AWARD 2013, International Architecture Award, Grand Prize
      BELGIAN PRIZE FOR ARCHITECTURE 2013, nomination category ‘not-residential public’

      The master plan calls for the appropriation of the land along the ring road, a zone that is normally only desirable for commercial visibility. Therefore, a signal building is proposed along the ring road and …

    • © XDGA, photo Strabag+XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • 2003-2011042 Kitchen Tower

      competition, built

      CityBrussels

      Programentrance pavillion, sportshall, kitchen tower, student housing, parking and renovation existing buildings

      Year2003-2011

      Procedurecompetition

      Statusbuilt

      ClientVlaamse Gemeenschapscommissie

      Total floor area3.293 m²

      Budget8.735.000 €

      ArchitectsXDGA, with Barbara Van Der Wee (renovation existing buildings)

      Structural engineerNey & Partners

      Mechanical engineerStudiebureau Boydens

      PhotographsFrans Parthesius

  • Sint-Lucas School of Fine Arts

    Sint-Lucas School of Fine Arts
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • Sint-Lucas School of Fine Arts

      The workshop building is also an autonomous form based on a piling of horizontal, alternating, opaque and translucent volumes. It is a building shaped simultaneously by its program, by urban rules and by its context. It is an irregular stacking of rectangular massive volumes with intermediate translucent parts providing zenithal light to the work stands. The piling up of the volumes settles all the building regulations and the insertion in its irregular context. Two workshops have a double height and mezzanine floors inside, the top one a single height. Each workshop has closed walls on its lower level as a work surface. The walls function as beams spanning from one core to the other in order to get workspace without internal structural elements.
      The inner court, a lapidarium, is enlarged and reconsidered as a micro-urban plan with different levels in which the existing collection is spatially reorganized.

      The workshop building is also an autonomous form based on a piling of horizontal, alternating, opaque and translucent volumes. It is a building shaped simultaneously by its program, by urban rules and by its context. …

    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • 2002-2013041 Sint-Lucas School of Fine Arts

      competition, built

      CityGhent

      Programmaster plan campus, art studios, library, cafeteria, renovation existing buildings

      Year2002-2013

      Procedurecompetition

      Statusbuilt

      ClientSint-Lucas Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst

      Total floor area7.000 m² (studio building: 1.550 m²)

      Budget7.200.000 € (studio building: 1.900.000 €)

      Structural engineerNey & Partners

      Mechanical engineerStudiebureau Boydens

      PhotographsFrans Parthesius

  • Extension of Monaco

    Extension of Monaco
  • College of Europe

    College of Europe
    • © XDGA, photo Andre Nullens
    • College of Europe

      The key issue here is how to insert new architecture in a loaded historical surrounding. Bruges is one of these cities that tries to keep its center intact, with the risk of banning too much of today’s city life. The city maintains a set of rules on scale, materials, roof inclinations… that are supposed to keep existing urban qualities intact. Among others, concrete façades and big glass surfaces are forbidden.

      Two buildings are to be added to an old school campus, which will house a postgraduate law and economics school. The campus consists of a conglomerate of historical buildings organized around a sequence of enclosed courts. The campus is accessed from three different streets. The two new volumes replace less valuable old buildings. They are set freestanding from the old buildings while redefining the courts; their ground floor surface is partially open and continuous with the courts. N1 consists of classrooms and a central reception desk, N2 accommodates two lecture rooms, some offices and a foyer on ground floor. One side of the building covers an outside entrance space to the campus that is accessed from an existing gate on the main street.

      A regular grid of prefabricated concrete elements forms both the supporting structure and a filter for light. The whitish, concrete outer surface is polished, which makes the material more ‘noble’ and acceptable for the city; inclined surfaces reflect the sunlight indirectly into the rooms. Behind the concrete structure is a full glass façade composed out of translucent glass elements and transparent windows. The grid gives both a depth and a texture to the façade. On the court level the concrete elements continue as a screen or as a fence.

      MIES VAN DE ROHE AWARD 2009, nomination

      The key issue here is how to insert new architecture in a loaded historical surrounding. Bruges is one of these cities that tries to keep its center intact, with the risk of banning too much …

    • © XDGA, photo Jan Kempenaers
    • © XDGA, photo Andre Nullens
    • © XDGA, photo Andre Nullens
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA, photo Andre Nullens
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA, photo Jan Kempenaers
    • © XDGA, photo Jan Kempenaers
    • © XDGA, photo Jan Kempenaers
    • © XDGA, photo Jan Kempenaers
    • 2001-2008035 College of Europe

      commission, built

      CityBruges

      Programteaching and administration building

      Year2001-2008

      Procedurecommission

      Statusbuilt

      ClientCollege of Europe

      Total floor area11.700 m²

      Budget17.350.000 €

      ArchitectsXDGA, with Architectenbureau Vanassche-Van Langenhove (restoration existing buildings)

      Structural engineerVK Engineering

      Mechanical engineerIngenium

      PhotographsJan Kempenaers, André Nullens

  • Faculty of Economics

    Faculty of Economics
    • © XDGA-SBA, photo Hans Werlemann
    • Faculty of Economics

      The campus path that crosses the building, the topography, the nearby existing economics building, and the new program together generate the form of the building. The path leads down from the street towards the roof of the existing building. On one side are organized all the vertical circulation shafts of the new building, on the other side a double height foyer is accessed from the path. The auditorium is situated above it and accessed through a main stair. Behind is a meeting room of the faculty. On the top level a library is organized around a patio, combined with offices. The front and back facade are in glass and cantilever outwards; two lateral facades are in concrete, one of them being a screen made out of 20m high concrete fins.

      MIES VAN DE ROHE AWARD 2007, nomination

      The campus path that crosses the building, the topography, the nearby existing economics building, and the new program together generate the form of the building. The path leads down from the street towards the roof …

    • © XDGA-SBA, photo Hans Werlemann
    • © XDGA-SBA
    • © XDGA-SBA
    • © XDGA-SBA, photo Hans Werlemann
    • © XDGA-SBA, photo Hans Werlemann
    • © XDGA-SBA, photo Hans Werlemann
    • © XDGA-SBA, photo Hans Werlemann
    • © XDGA-SBA
    • © XDGA-SBA, photo Hans Werlemann
    • © XDGA-SBA, photo Hans Werlemann
    • 2001-2006018 Faculty of Economics

      commission, built

      CityGhent

      Programhall, auditorium, library, offices

      Year2001-2006

      Procedurecommission

      Statusbuilt

      ClientGhent University

      Total floor area7.241 m²

      Budget7.822.821 €

      ArchitectsXaveer De Geyter Architects, Stéphane Beel Architects

      LandscapeMichel Desvigne Paysagiste

      Structural engineerSWK Arcadis

      Mechanical engineerIngenium

      PhotographsHans Werlemann

  • University Forum

    University Forum
  • MAS Museum

    MAS Museum
    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • MAS Museum

      This museum devoted to the history of the City of Antwerp brings together several very different collections. The multiplicity and variety of objects and themes, and the resultant diversity in terms of visitors demanded some reflection on customary museum typologies. Certain ‘valueless’ objects can only be displayed in large numbers, interpretative exhibitions based on carefully selected objects are not enough, and white museum space is hardly needed. We proposed a museum capable of opening up and exploring that multiplicity. It is essentially a storehouse in which all the material is set out, chronologically, for instance, and by size. This matrix is made accessible in a different ways – via the Internet, a retrieval system, interpretative exhibitions, guest-curators’ circuits and so on. But it also allows you to lose yourself in the archive, to embark on an obsessive quest, to make a lightning visit or to wander round with no particular narrative in mind. The museum no longer shows a single synthesis of Antwerp’s history, but generates many layers of possible perception. The difference between the public and non-public programs and between exhibition and research disappears. At street level, the museum comprises a field of alternating strips of storage and exhibition space that take up the entire area available for construction. The result is a building that is at once radical and modest, with a maximum footprint and limited height. Generally speaking, the exhibition strips are light and empty, the archive spaces full and dark. Larger exhibition spaces are hollowed out within the strips, through which the official exhibition circuit passes. Other elements of the programme – restoration workshop, rest area, documentation centre, educational area, administrative zones and the loading and unloading bay – are incorporated in the strip pattern and blend with the museum space. The public exterior space is located peripherally around the museum.

      This museum devoted to the history of the City of Antwerp brings together several very different collections. The multiplicity and variety of objects and themes, and the resultant diversity in terms of visitors demanded some …

    • © XDGA, photo Frans Parthesius
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • 2000017 MAS Museum

      competition,

      CityAntwerp

      Programhistorical museum

      Year2000

      Procedurecompetition

      Total floor area16.000 m²

      Structural engineerOve Arup & Partners, Athenco

      Mechanical engineerOve Arup & Partners

      PhotographsFrans Parthesius

  • Carrefour de l’Europe 2

    Carrefour de l’Europe 2
    • © XDGA, photo Hans Werlemann
    • Carrefour de l’Europe 2

      More than four centuries of urban transformation between the St Michael’s Cathedral and Mont des Arts have failed to keep up with the changing significance of this location. For a long time this area functioned as a link between the upper and lower city: the first one corresponding with the medieval commercial Brussels and the second with the modern power – centres of Brussels, with its typical axis’ and vistas. The whole area has a history of quick successions of alterations, one change very often being the negation of the previous one. During the 20th century several interventions connected the area with the hinterland. Those successive additions of new infrastructures (the North–South railway junction, the Central Station, the urban clearway, a multilevel car park and the metro system) changed the identity of the district on regular intervals and transformed it into one of the biggest transit zones in Belgium. Individual buildings were added to the new infrastructure, leaving an ocean of undefined open spaces between them.

      A series of new spaces were created underground – partly new programs, partly leftovers from the new infrastructure. That open space was appropriated in turn in the 1980s for the construction of hotels – freestanding, once again. The residual urban space was rendered even seedier than it had been before. The competition that prompted our project called for that space to be redeveloped. Our proposal took the existing, solitary buildings and the non-constructed area and merged them with new infrastructure and construction to form a ‘superblock’ with the Central Station as its heart. The Boulevard de l’Impératrice is branched off into surrounding streets and car parks and public space within the block are focused into a chain of existing and new spaces.

      More than four centuries of urban transformation between the St Michael’s Cathedral and Mont des Arts have failed to keep up with the changing significance of this location. For a long time this area functioned as a link between the upper and lower city: the first one corresponding with the medieval commercial Brussels and the second with the modern power – centres of Brussels, with its typical axis’ and vistas. The whole area has a history of quick successions of alterations, one change very often being the negation of the previous one. During the 20th century several interventions connected the area with the hinterland. Those successive additions of new infrastructures (the North–South railway junction, the Central Station, the urban clearway, a multilevel car park and the metro system) changed the identity of the district on regular intervals and transformed it into one of the biggest transit zones in Belgium. Individual buildings were added to the new infrastructure, leaving an ocean of undefined open spaces between them.

    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • 1997 / 1998011 Carrefour de l’Europe 2

      competition − 1st prize ex-aequo,

      CityBrussels

      Programurban development plan for a new public area around Central Station

      Year1997 / 1998

      Procedurecompetition − 1st prize ex-aequo

      ClientCity of Brussels

      Total floor area140.619 m² (existing) + 225.023 m² (new)

      PhotographsHans Werlemann

  • Chassé Park Apartments

    Chassé Park Apartments
    • © XDGA, photo Petra Stavast
    • Chassé Park Apartments

      A former military base in the centre of Breda has been reclaimed by the city. It is a green area with a series of large buildings with varying functions on the city side. The development plan by OMA comprises a public park in which a series of varied residential buildings are set individually, placing the surrounding buildings in a new context. A series of through views and entrances into the park have also been created.

      One group consists of a series of five residential towers on top of a parking ring, which surrounds a sunken inner garden – also public. The entrances to each of the towers open onto the garden. The parking ring rises 1.5 meters above ground level and is partly transparent, while hillocks are included in the inner garden, which rise in turn above the parking roof.

      The towers are located close together, each with its own orientation. Their position relative to one another is determined by factors such as the view outwards and inwards, exposure to sunlight, transparency and the definition of the inner zone. Three of the five towers have two apartments per storey, the fourth one and the fifth four. The varying relative position of the towers creates small differences in ground plans and elevations. All the apartments have a large veranda, which can be used as an external space, a separate room or as part of the living room. The materials are limited to glass, prefabricated concrete panels inlaid with slate and glazed white bricks for the façades. The garage roof is made of translucent polyester, while a concrete framework acts as the support structure behind the glass curtain walls.

      MIES VAN DER ROHE AWARD 2003, nomination

      A former military base in the centre of Breda has been reclaimed by the city. It is a green area with a series of large buildings with varying functions on the city side. The development …

    • © XDGA, photo Wim Ruigrok
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA, photo Gilbert Fastenaekens
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA
    • © XDGA, photo Gilbert Fastenaekens
    • © XDGA, photo Hans Werlemann
    • © XDGA, photo Gilbert Fastenaekens
    • © XDGA, photo Petra Stavast
    • 1996-2001007 Chassé Park Apartments

      commission, built

      CityBreda

      Programfive towers with 137 apartments and car park

      Year1996-2001

      Procedurecommission

      Statusbuilt

      ClientChassé CV, joint venture Proper Stok Woningen and Wilma Bouw

      Total floor area31.000 m²

      Budget18.562.180 €

      LandscapeWest8

      Structural engineerSnellen, Meulemans & Van Schaaik

      PhotographsHans Werlemann, Gilbert Fastenaekens, Petra Stavast